Wednesday, December 19, 2007

I couldn't have said it better...

This article says what I have been thinking for a long time, and why I fear for the future of this great nation.

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,317389,00.html

Personal Responsibility Is Being Banned in America

Tuesday, December 18, 2007
By Neil Cavuto

This isn't about banning cupcakes in school. This is about banning personal responsibility in America.

Don't you see what's going on here? You can't take care of yourself. Let the food police take care of yourself for you.

You can't control your kids' weight. Let the government control their weight for you.

You can't read the paperwork on a subprime mortgage you suddenly can't pay, let the government pay it for you.

You can't find a level playing field with the rich? Let the government tax them more and level it for you.

See a trend here? I do.

We're stupid. We're fat. We're lazy. We're clueless.

And the government is coming in to make things right.

Some of us welcome the help. I fear it. And here's why.

Good intentions come at a cost, my friends. I'm not talking about the cost in dollars. I'm talking about the cost in dignity.

Because this nanny state costs us our freedom, our self respect, our very being. They don't tell you that when they help you.

You only see it after the fact, when they own you.

Tuesday, December 18, 2007

Mormonism Explained

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,317272,00.html

This article was kind of fun to read. It amazes me that so many of these questions are still asked. For additional information about The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, please visit:

http://www.mormon.org or http://www.lds.org

21 Questions Answered About Mormon Faith

Tuesday , December 18, 2007

FC1


Mitt Romney’s run for president has put his Mormon faith in the spotlight, but the religion remains a mystery to most.

FOXNews.com compiled a list of 21 questions representing some widely held beliefs and misconceptions about Mormonism and posed them to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

The Church objected to answering some of the questions on the grounds that they misrepresent the basic tenets of the Mormon religion.

"Many of these questions are typically found on anti-Mormon blogs or Web sites which aim to misrepresent or distort Mormon doctrines," the Church said in a statement. "Several of these questions do not represent ... any serious attempt to depict the core values and beliefs of its members."

Here are the questions and how the Church responded:

Q: Why do some call the Church a cult?

A: For the most part, this seems to stem from a lack of understanding about the Church and its core doctrines and beliefs. Under those circumstances it is too easy to label a religion or other organization that is not well-known with an inflammatory term like 'cult.' Famed scholar of religion Martin Marty has said a cult means a church you don't personally happen to like. We don't believe any organization should be subjected to a label that has come to be as pejorative as that one.

Q: Does the Mormon Church believe that Jesus Christ is the son of God?

A: Mormons believe Jesus Christ is literally the Son of God, the Savior and Redeemer, who died for the sins of humankind and rose from the dead on the third day with an immortal body. God, the Father, also has an immortal body.

Q: Does the Church believe in the divinity of Jesus?

A: Mormons believe Jesus Christ is literally the Son of God, the Savior and Redeemer, who died for the sins of humankind and rose from the dead on the third day with an immortal body. God, the Father, also has an immortal body.

Q: Does the Church believe that God is a physical being?

A: Mormons believe Jesus Christ is literally the Son of God, the Savior and Redeemer, who died for the sins of humankind and rose from the dead on the third day with an immortal body. God, the Father, also has an immortal body.

Q: If so, does the Church believe that God lives on a planet named Kolob?

A: 'Kolob' is a term found in ancient records translated by Joseph Smith. Joseph Smith did not provide a full description or explanation of Kolob nor did he assign the idea particular significance in relation to the Church’s core doctrines.

Q: Where is the planet Kolob? What significance does the planet have to Mormons?

A: 'Kolob' is a term found in ancient records translated by Joseph Smith. Joseph Smith did not provide a full description or explanation of Kolob nor did he assign the idea particular significance in relation to the Church’s core doctrines.

Q: Does the Mormon Church believe that God and Mary had physical sex to conceive Jesus?

A: The Church does not claim to know how Jesus was conceived but believes the Bible and Book of Mormon references to Jesus being born of the Virgin Mary.

Q: Does the Mormon Church believe Jesus appeared in North America after his crucifixion and resurrection?

A: The appearance of Jesus in the Western Hemisphere shortly after his resurrection is described in the Book of Mormon. Mormons believe that when Christ told his disciples in the Bible He had other 'sheep' who should receive his message he was referring to those people in the Western Hemisphere.

Q: If so, when did this happen? And under what circumstances?

A: The appearance of Jesus in the Western Hemisphere shortly after his resurrection is described in the Book of Mormon. Mormons believe that when Christ told his disciples in the Bible He had other 'sheep' who should receive his message he was referring to those people in the Western Hemisphere.

Q: Does the Mormon Church believe its followers can become "gods and goddesses" after death?

A: We believe that the apostle Peter’s biblical reference to partaking of the divine nature and the apostle Paul’s reference to being 'joint heirs with Christ' reflect the intent that children of God should strive to emulate their Heavenly Father in every way. Throughout the eternities, Mormons believe, they will reverence and worship God the Father and Jesus Christ. The goal is not to equal them or to achieve parity with them but to imitate and someday acquire their perfect goodness, love and other divine attributes.

Q: Does the Mormon Church believe that women can only gain access to heaven with a special pass or codewords?

A: No.

Q: Does the Mormon Church believe that women must serve men on both Earth and in heaven?

A: Absolutely not. Mormons believe that women and men are complete equals before God and in relation to the blessings available in the Church.

Q: Is there such a thing as Mormon "underwear"? if so, are all Mormons required to wear it? What does it symbolize?

A: Like members of many religious faiths, Latter-day Saints wear religious clothing. But members of other faiths — typically those involved in permanent pastoral ministries or religious services — usually wear religious garments as outer ceremonial vestments or symbols of recognition. In The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, garments are worn beneath street clothing as a personal and private reminder of commitments to God.

Garments are considered sacred by Church members and are not regarded as a topic for casual conversation.

Q: Does the Mormon Church believe in the existence of another physical planet or planets, where Mormons will "rule" after their death and ascension?

A: No.

Q: What specifically does the Mormon Church say about African-Americans and Native Americans?

A: Mormons believe that all mankind are sons and daughters of God and should be loved and respected as such. The blessings of the gospel are available to all.

Q: What are or were the "Golden Plates"?

A: The Book of Mormon was translated by Joseph Smith from records made on plates of gold, similar to metal plates that have been found in other ancient cultures. It contained a history of peoples in the Western Hemisphere including an appearance by the Savior to them. As such, the Book of Mormon is considered a second testimony of Jesus Christ.

Q: Are consumption of alcohol and tobacco prohibited or simply discouraged?

A: It is against the teachings of the Church to use alcohol and tobacco or to drink tea and coffee.

Q: Does the Church also ban the consumption of "hot drinks"? And does that apply specifically to caffeinated drinks?

A: It is against the teachings of the Church to use alcohol and tobacco or to drink tea and coffee.

Q: Why do Mormons go from door to door?

A: Christ admonished his disciples to take the gospel to the world. The Church follows that admonition and sends missionaries throughout the world.

Q: What do the Mormons believe about the family?

A: Mormons believe that the family is the foundation for this life and the life to come.

Q: Can someone who may never marry in life have eternal marriage?

A: God will not withhold blessings from any of his children who may not have the opportunity to marry in this life.

Thursday, December 13, 2007

Media Bias is alive and well...

The Silent Forces That Will Shape the Political Landscape

This is a great commentary about how non-profit organizations from the left are treated differently from the right. I highly recommend it.

Tuesday, December 11, 2007

Another breath of fresh air...

In Politics, Values Matter, Not Theology

This is a great piece of commentary, which reminds us of what we should really be judging a candidate by.

Monday, December 10, 2007

The "Golde Rule" even applies to politics...

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,316257,00.html

Susan Estrich -

"I was sitting at a dinner last year with some distinguished Southern Baptist educators, university leaders. I asked them if they would consider voting for Mitt Romney, expecting them either to say that they would, or at least that their reasons for saying "no" would have nothing to do with his Mormonism. There was a moment of silence, before one finally looked at me and said, quite simply, “No. He doesn’t believe in the Trinity.”

I did not point out what should have been obvious: neither do I. For me, at least, the only honest answer I can find is one that is, perhaps ironically, rooted in our religious tradition. It is the imperative of fairness, the mandate of consideration, the rule that we should treat others as we would have them treat us. It is because of my religion, in the end, that I think it is wrong to hold Mitt Romney’s against him.

It is not because religion has no place in politics, but because no message of the Judaeo-Christian tradition is stronger than the Golden Rule that I believe Gov. Romney should be judged based on his qualifications, and not his faith. And when I see all those rabbis next week, that’s what I plan to tell them."


Great statement. Whether or not you believe in Mormonism and it's doctrines, those doctrines should have no bearing on whether or not you vote for Mitt Romney. I may not agree fully with the doctrine of Catholics, or Baptists, or Buddhists, or other religions. But I recognize that if they are truly living their life according to the teachings of those denominations or religions, it makes them a better person. Just as I don't want to be treated unfairly by those who do not understand what I believe, I should not treat them unfairly by judging their character because of the doctrines that I do not understand or that seem "strange" to me. If there is one thing that almost all religions have in common, it is that they teach us to be kind, to love our neighbor, to help one another, to be honest, and a host of other extremely valuable principles. I don't care what religion the president is if he or she is a moral, principled individual, who will work for the strengthening of the moral soul United States of America. We are quickly losing our footing as a moral people in America. The time honored and time-tested values that have made us the strongest country in the world are being forgotten for more "progressive" ideas that weaken the very bond that holds us together. Personal responsibility has been abandoned, as we are constantly seeking to blame someone else for our wrong doings. We will only realize what we have when it has been taken from us. Unfortunately, that time is drawing incredibly near.

Tuesday, December 4, 2007

Once Again, the Ones Who Cry Intolerance are Intolerant...

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,314941,00.html

Stories like this make my blood boil! This man believes it is unconstitutional to have the words "...one nation under God" in th Pledge of Allegiance and "In God we Trust" on money, because he doesn't believe in God and therefore is "forced" to acknowledge God. Who is forcing him???!!!! I respect that he does not believe in God. That is his God-given right. I don't hold him in any contempt for not believing in God. Again, that is the beauty of this country. I'm sure he is a great dad and a good man.

What I cannot stand for is the absolute hypocrisy that is shown by people like this man, as well as other groups. They continually cry foul, whenever their beliefs do not coincide with those of the majority, and use the courts to try to change everything. They claim that those words violate the separation of church and state (that's a whole different topic I'll cover someday), which is completely false...what separation of church and state means is that there will be no state-sponsored religion...like there was in England in the 16th century. I'll stop there. The only national religion we have right now is the religion of amorality. I digress.

The thing that REALLY bothers me about this is how he believes that the vast majority who believe in God MUST respect his view that God does not exist, yet he believes he does NOT have to be tolerant of those that believe in God. He feels that those who believe in God are imposing on his right to not believe in God, but in reality, we don't care. He can believe whatever he wants. That's fine. It's America. But what he fails to see (or maybe really does see and this is actually his plan) is that because of his "lawsuits", he is trying to impose his view on the rest of us who believe in God. What a complete hypocrite. That is what bothers me the most. This argument is completely irrational, and I have no idea why the federal courts even look at this case. Where is majority rule? We have become a nation of extreme vocal minority rule forcing the courts to impose on the majority, the beliefs of a few, and they do it because it is "unconstitutional." Unconstitutional to me is imposing the views of a minority on a majority through the undemocratic way of the courts. We have become a nation driven by lawsuits and court orders. It will be a pivotal day in America when we reject the very God that made us a nation. I fear that we are closer than we think.